"Romney adopted knee-jerk anti-Russian positions on every relevant issue, and married them to reflexive anti-Obama criticisms. That’s all that he did. It isn’t surprising, since he had no particular foreign policy experience, nor had he had much of an interest in these issues before he started his seemingly endless presidential campaigning. Romney had no particular insight into Russian behavior, and definitely didn’t understand what motivated Russian leaders or how they viewed U.S. policies in the former Soviet Union and elsewhere. If the U.S. had been following his recommendations over the last year, tensions between the U.S. and Russia would likely be even worse, since Romney’s idea for Russia policy in practice was little more than to antagonize Moscow whenever possible."

Romney Wasn’t “Churchill-Like” on Russia, He Was Thoroughly Ignorant

"Among the series enjoying critical acclaim — True Detective, Breaking Bad — women are often either shiftless femmes fatales or harried wife-mothers the protagonist is neglecting/staying alive to provide for. In the USA consultant procedural, girlfriends and wives are always first and foremost teammates and partners. They’re never victims, and their lives can’t be traded in for male character development. Sex itself is an afterthought on all these shows — never a central plot point or a significant character motivation. It’s one of the reasons media critics tend not to take the series seriously, but it’s a small price to pay for some television that doesn’t center on sexual violence."

USA Network Is Television’s Best Answer To The Shifting Social Order

A bill that would require craft brewers to sell their suds to a beer distributor and make them buy it back to sell at their own breweries has cleared a Senate panel.
 
The measure (SB 1714) has so infuriated craft brewers and beer enthusiasts that some on Twitter have christened it with the hashtag “#growlergate.” The Community Affairs committee approved the bill Tuesday.
 
Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, was so incensed at the idea of craft brewers having to pay someone else to sell their own product that he likened it to a mobbed-up racket. Latvala has championed the microbrewery cause.
 
The requirement is similar to paying “protection to ‘Vinnie’ in New York,” he said.
 
The bill also is favored by the Big Beer lobby, which is feeling the heat from craft beer’s competition.

The Internet swears Juliana Hatfield’s ‘President Garfield’ is about Henry Rollins. Entertainment Weekly called it a “thinly veiled dig”. I never thought about it before, but I can see it now. I’m not sure if I see the negative angle, though. I may have known the story behind it at one point. I listened to this record a lot. But that was a long time ago. 

Every time that truck goes by, I think of you
You drove right through the wall
And now the kids all wanna follow you
I don’t smoke, so why am I smokin’?
Took a hit and now I’m chokin’

He wrote a book about himself
I keep it on my shelf and when I was in Washington,
I walked down all the streets of which he wrote
I can’t sing, I’m not a singer
I swear, I’m gonna kill myself if you bring her
Her, her, her, her, her, her

Iron will, iron hand, neck like a tire, iron man
Iron fist, pump that jam, iron eye, iron gland
Iron face, iron plan, fill that empty coffee can
Iron bar, metal band, pumping iron man

I am only human, I am weak
I want his power inside of me
And I’m not talking about a piece of meat
I’m saying something really deep

policymic:

The less people know where Ukraine is, the more they want America to intervene
Turns out many of the people calling for a military intervention in Ukraine as a response to the illegal Russian annexation of the Crimean peninsula have one thing in common: They have no idea where Ukraine is on a map.
No, really. According to polling data from political scientists Kyle Dropp (Darthmouth), Joshua D. Kertzer (Harvard), and Thomas Zeitzoff (Princeton), there’s a direct statistical correlation between not knowing where Ukraine was and wanting the United States to intervene with military force. The researchers asked a national sample of 2,066 Americans at the end of March about their demographic characteristics as well as their general foreign policy attitudes. Then they asked to the respondents to pinpoint Ukraine on a map, which is where it gets pretty dicey. The results can be seen above; the dots shift from blue to red as they near the actual location of the conflicted country.
Read more 

policymic:

The less people know where Ukraine is, the more they want America to intervene

Turns out many of the people calling for a military intervention in Ukraine as a response to the illegal Russian annexation of the Crimean peninsula have one thing in common: They have no idea where Ukraine is on a map.

No, really. According to polling data from political scientists Kyle Dropp (Darthmouth), Joshua D. Kertzer (Harvard), and Thomas Zeitzoff (Princeton), there’s a direct statistical correlation between not knowing where Ukraine was and wanting the United States to intervene with military force. The researchers asked a national sample of 2,066 Americans at the end of March about their demographic characteristics as well as their general foreign policy attitudes. Then they asked to the respondents to pinpoint Ukraine on a map, which is where it gets pretty dicey. The results can be seen above; the dots shift from blue to red as they near the actual location of the conflicted country.

Read more 

"No dining experience is more associated with the concept of freshness than sushi: If the notoriously squeamish American diner is to consider eating raw fish, that fish had better be fresh. But the truth is, sushi’s not great because it’s fresh. It’s great because it’s actually sort of rotten.

That rice the chef presented to me was stored for a year or two before being cooked with sugar and rice-wine vinegar. The pickled ginger was probably made three months ago. The artisanal soy sauce could be four years old. The ikura has been cured in wet brine and stored for who knows how long. The nori hasn’t seen the ocean in ages. And the star of the show? Truthfully, unless you’re Tom Hanks in Cast Away or the kids from The Blue Lagoon, you don’t want to eat fresh fish. Once a fish has been dead for more than a few minutes, the flesh goes into rigor mortis, and it can take four or five days to relax and reach its apex of deliciousness.

We reflexively recoil from the word “rot” when it comes to food, and we shouldn’t. We pay a premium for dry-aged beef because we know the older the steak, the more tender it is and the more umami it develops. That beef is rotting (okay, “aging”), but under our terms and to our benefit. Many foods are rotted to make them edible at all: olives, chocolate, coffee. And there are those that we rot to improve: pickles, cheese, wine. I find it hilarious that even the freshest foods are seasoned with rot. We dress salads with vinegar, a.k.a. rotten wine. I can’t even come up with a list of foods that I enjoy fresh more than aged—it basically stops after orange juice.”

David Chang: Keep your fresh food. I want rot.

"Steven Tyler, still singing with a voice padded with baby fat and not quite rocked and reeled by the chemical harvest, assumes the role of the itinerant bluesman who strolls into town with his guitar and nobody gives a preacher’s damn about him. Nobody listens as he plays his song, or drops a coin into his hat as it sits on the sidewalk. He’s singing “dream until your dream’ll come true” as a salve for his own wounded pride. He came in with his six string slung over his shoulder like a samurai, but he’ll leave with his tail between his legs like a beaten dog.

Worse than that…he knows it.

That anguished screech at the end sounds more like someone being confronted by awful, painful truth than a victory wail, and that it should precede those Hammer Horrors tones that close the song out is indicative. He’s going crazy, maybe only a little but, but a little crazy is still a difficult state of mind. That same screech would become Tyler’s stock-in-trade, and wouldn’t have nearly the same level of importance to their accompanying songs.”

Affirmation From The Mountain Of Madness: Aerosmith’s “Dream On”

"Google has learned its lesson from the privacy policy fiasco of 2012. Instead of a grand announcement, publicity campaigns or a post on the official Google blog, it mentioned it in passing, without explaining what it means to be signed in to everything all the time. (It’s also telling that the announcement came tucked away in a note about an incremental change to the Gmail app, though implementing such a change would have required work outside that app.) By the time of publication, Google had not responded to a request for comment on why it had kept the announcement so low-key."

Brendan Eich did not fall victim to the Internet mob. He is hardly the most hated CEO in the world. Most people have probably never heard of him or his company. Other deeply unpopular CEOs easily hold onto their jobs despite intense public criticism.

If you feel the need to admonish, admonish Mozilla. Eich didn’t need our support to be CEO. He needed Mozilla’s.

He didn’t have it.

Me, in response to Dave Winer’s condemnation of the Internet mob.
kateoplis:

"The unstated mission of the Washington Redskins Original Americans Foundation is clear: In the face of growing criticism over the team’s toxic name and mascot imagery, the aim is to buy enough good will so the name doesn’t seem so bad, and if some American Indians — in the racial logic of so-called post-racial America, “some” can stand in for “all” — accept Mr. Snyder’s charity, then protest will look like hypocrisy.
In his news release and public statements, Mr. Snyder refers to “our shared Washington Redskins” heritage. To be clear: There is no “our” that includes Mr. Snyder. And there is no “Redskins” that includes us. There has been a sustained effort for decades by activists to change the name of this team and others. Members of my tribe, the Ojibwe, have been a big part of such efforts.
But the franchise, valued at $1.7 billion, has a long history of sacrificing decency at the altar of commerce: George Preston Marshall refused to integrate the team until 1962 (the rest of the N.F.L. began doing so in 1946). When the government forced the team to include black players, fans protested outside carrying signs saying “Keep Redskins White!” At stake back then was money (Marshall was afraid that he’d lose fans if African-Americans were on the roster). Money is similarly at stake now. According to Forbes, the Redskins are the eighth most valuable sports franchise in the world.
Just consider the merchandise alone. Seldom has the entwined nature of ethics and money and influence been revealed as so unavoidably intestinal in its smell and purpose: to consume the material, to nourish the host and to expel the waste. American Indians — who do not see or refer to ourselves as “redskins” and who take great exception to the slur — are that waste.
This isn’t merely symbolic. In 1863, the Cheyenne chief Black Kettle traveled to Washington to protest the government’s treatment of his people. Instead of redress, he received a presidential medal presented by President Lincoln. He was wearing the same medal when he was gunned down by the United States Cavalry at Sand Creek in 1868.
Census data shows that four out of the five poorest United States counties are found within the borders of Indian reservations. So, sure, the gifts of a backhoe and coats are much needed and much appreciated. But gift-giving to Indians rather than systemic change has been an all-too-familiar practice over the centuries, and whether the gifts are beads, backhoes or presidential medals, we know just how much they’re really worth.”
Read on: The Price of a Slur

kateoplis:

"The unstated mission of the Washington Redskins Original Americans Foundation is clear: In the face of growing criticism over the team’s toxic name and mascot imagery, the aim is to buy enough good will so the name doesn’t seem so bad, and if some American Indians — in the racial logic of so-called post-racial America, “some” can stand in for “all” — accept Mr. Snyder’s charity, then protest will look like hypocrisy.

In his news release and public statements, Mr. Snyder refers to “our shared Washington Redskins” heritage. To be clear: There is no “our” that includes Mr. Snyder. And there is no “Redskins” that includes us. There has been a sustained effort for decades by activists to change the name of this team and others. Members of my tribe, the Ojibwe, have been a big part of such efforts.

But the franchise, valued at $1.7 billion, has a long history of sacrificing decency at the altar of commerce: George Preston Marshall refused to integrate the team until 1962 (the rest of the N.F.L. began doing so in 1946). When the government forced the team to include black players, fans protested outside carrying signs saying “Keep Redskins White!” At stake back then was money (Marshall was afraid that he’d lose fans if African-Americans were on the roster). Money is similarly at stake now. According to Forbes, the Redskins are the eighth most valuable sports franchise in the world.

Just consider the merchandise alone. Seldom has the entwined nature of ethics and money and influence been revealed as so unavoidably intestinal in its smell and purpose: to consume the material, to nourish the host and to expel the waste. American Indians — who do not see or refer to ourselves as “redskins” and who take great exception to the slur — are that waste.

This isn’t merely symbolic. In 1863, the Cheyenne chief Black Kettle traveled to Washington to protest the government’s treatment of his people. Instead of redress, he received a presidential medal presented by President Lincoln. He was wearing the same medal when he was gunned down by the United States Cavalry at Sand Creek in 1868.

Census data shows that four out of the five poorest United States counties are found within the borders of Indian reservations. So, sure, the gifts of a backhoe and coats are much needed and much appreciated. But gift-giving to Indians rather than systemic change has been an all-too-familiar practice over the centuries, and whether the gifts are beads, backhoes or presidential medals, we know just how much they’re really worth.”

Read on: The Price of a Slur