"For a long time we couldn’t get advertising. The advertisers would say, ‘I’m not going to advertise in that disgusting magazine.’ But that soon changed. At 295,000 it was disgusting. At 305,000 it was an important audience that needed to be reached on its own terms."
- Henry Beard on starting The National Lampoon (via maxistentialist)

(via parislemon)

For Zephyr and Tim for NY: Please help now!

lessig:

I sent this to the MaydayPAC list: 

Your Mayday PAC is focused on the task of electing a Congress committed to fundamental reform by 2016. I am incredibly excited about the progress we have made so far, and we are keenly focused on making this year a successful first step to that critical goal.
But I’m writing today to ask you to support someone who I believe is the most important anti-corruption candidate in any race in America today — Zephyr Teachout, running for Governor in New York.
This is a one time ask: I won’t ask you again and this is the only person not running for Congress that I will ask you to support. But I wouldn’t make an exception to our “Congress-only” rule if this weren’t important. And this race is critically important. 
Zephyr is running in the Democratic Primary for governor. She is running against Andrew Cuomo — a man who ran for governor on an anti-corruption platform, but who has now made a mockery of our cause. Failing to deliver on his promise to change the way elections are funded in New York was bad enough. But now we have learned that he corruptly influenced his own anti-corruption commission to protect his friends from criticism or embarrassment.[1] 
The story in The Times was bad enough. Cuomo’s response was worse — almost Nixonian: There was nothing corrupt, he said, about him interfering with “his” “independent” (as he called it) anti-corruption commission because the commission worked for him. He was free, Cuomo argued, to tell the world it was “independent,” explicitly saying it was free to investigate anyone, while secretly telling the commission to stay away from leads that might embarrass him. 
That was Nixon’s argument when he told the Watergate special prosecutor to withdraw his demand for the tapes that eventually brought down his administration. It was wrong then. It is wrong now. It shows a stunning blindness to the role of a leader — certainly a self-proclaimed leader of the anti-corruption cause. 
I have known Zephyr for more than a decade. I relied on her scholarship in my own book, Republic, Lost, and I have used her analysis again and again in my talks. She is a tireless fighter for better government. She would make an outstanding governor. And she will stop at nothing to end the corruption in New York government — starting at the very top.
Zephyr needs our help now. The governor has tried to keep her off the ballot by arguing first that the 45,000 signatures she turned in were not enough (state law requires 15,000). Then his lawyers said she wasn’t a resident — basically because she made too many trips to visit her parents in Vermont. A judge has now ruled against the Governor, but he has vowed to appeal the decision. The New York Times has criticized him for his “political bullying” and urged him to take seriously a serious candidate challenging him in a primary.[2] 
The experts say it will be tough to beat Cuomo. But I remember being told how tough it was going to be to raise $1M in 30 days, and then $5M in the next 30 days. That experience taught me one thing: If you give America a plan for fixing their corrupt government, they’ll step up to do it. 
Zephyr is the New York plan. She has exactly the right passion and courage. And we need to support her — as Democrats, if you’re a Democrat, because our party should be better than Andrew Cuomo. And as an American, if you’re an American, because we must take this stand against the cynical abuse of a movement that you have done so much to support. 
Just this once: Please click here to be directed to Zephyr’s donation page. We won’t be collecting the money. We won’t be waging a New York campaign. But we want to do whatever we can to support the most important anti-corruption candidate in the nation.
Please do whatever you can. 

-Lessig
Mayday PAC

[1] The New York TimesCuomo’s Office Hobbled Ethics Inquiries by Moreland Commission, July 23, 2014
[2] The New York TimesGov. Cuomo Should Welcome Zephyr Teachout, August 11, 2014
 
Please support them if you can. 

imageoscillite:

'Center of the Sun' is an animated pseudo-documentary of the life cycle of an Olmec sun god. You should watch it in HD on a big screen with the sound turned way up. 

"The anger of the Palestinians cannot be ended by killing their children. That is a fantasy. Human beings simply aren’t made that way."
-

Wallace Shawn

Shawn attended The Putney School, a private liberal arts high school in Putney, Vermont, and graduated with an A.B. in history from Harvard College. He studied economics and philosophy at Oxford, originally intending to become a diplomat; he also traveled to India as an English teacher, on a Fulbright program.

wallace shawn palestine israel killing

"Ralph is not a rule-follower like Lisa, nor a rule-breaker like Bart; Ralph does not observe the rules because he is almost completely unaware of them. More than any of the other students at Springfield Elementary, Ralph is a child. Bart and Lisa and Milhouse and Nelson and Janey are kids, and therein lies the difference."
-

Ralph Wiggum’s Finest Moments

"Child" versus "kid."

Wow. I’d never really thought about that distinction before, so, when I read this today, it hit me like a ton of bricks.

My daughter is mostly still a child—not quite a kid—and a lot of stuff makes more sense if I keep that in mind.

(via merlin)

(via merlin)

Anonymous asked:

Is it racist that a white, 20 year old unarmed kid was shot by a black cop on Monday, Aug 18, 3 days ago and its no where in the news? Oh wait, it happens all the time, its just not newsworthy. Sucks to be white.

Worship The Glitch Answer:

yoisthisracist:

Dear Racists: I know you’re going to to be trotting this out in the next few days claiming that this shows how white people are just as badly treated as black people in the US (though, of course, the idea that “it happens all the time” to white people is, of course, a ridiculous and disgusting lie).

But guess what, fuckheads, as usual, you’re wrong as fuck. The reason this tragedy isn’t national news is because, surprise surprise, a similar (ish) shooting of a white teenager by a black cop is being handled by the authorities completely differently! That’s right, you dumbfucks, this officer is being immediately and vigorously investigated, the officer’s name was released, the victim wasn’t denied medical care, nor was his body left on the street for hours. It’s almost like we treat black and white people differently in our justice system! And if you want to argue that the fucking Salt Lake City PD (oh shit, was I able to read about this case in the NATIONAL NEWS?!?!?! ) is racist against white people, you are fucking out of your mind.

So, nice try, you asshole, I know you were salivating over finding a case to compare this to Mike Brown, but, even with this timing, you’re not even fucking close to proving your racist “point.”

thingiverse:

How much more minimalist can a Macbook stand be?

None. None more minimalist.

I’m running the Yosemite beta, which makes me want to use my 13” Retina display instead of my big non-Retina monitor. Walter Hsiao’s MacBook Pro Display Stand is just what the doctor ordered. 

jayparkinsonmd:

See that weird rash caused by a fitbit? That’s the only time a doctor will ever care about your fitbit. They’ll never care about the data generated from these devices, ever. Why?
Because ignorance is bliss. Imagine if a doctor’s typical panel of 2500 patients all had fitbits and were all generating data and sharing all that daily data with doctors. That’s a lot of data for a doctor to digest on a daily basis. Of course the doctor surely wouldn’t be responsible for all of that data. The doctor would only be responsible for the data that sets off some sort of trigger. Let’s say that there’s a miracle device with a miracle algorithm that flags 1% of users as atypical and something the doctor should be analyzing. That means a doctor would then be looking at data from 25 patients a day. Doctors typically see 25 patients a day in their practice, so now they are responsible for 25 more patients, analyzing their data, and then acting on the results. Meanwhile they’re not getting paid for this kind of management. Would this be a co-pay that patients pay? Could doctors open up cases for you that would then give them the freedom to take your co-pay whenever they want?
And what happens when they overlook a blip in someone’s data and don’t act on it? Are they negligent? Will they be sued for malpractice? Will you also be able to sue Apple or Fitbit because of a flawed algorithm that didn’t trigger alarms for life-threatening data it’s collecting about you? 
It’s the same issue with paper records. If you have your paper records and deliver an inch-thick of paper to your new doctor, it’s in the doctor’s best interest to refuse to take them. Because if they do take them, they are assuming responsibility for them and are then expected to know the information in that stack of papers. If they don’t take them, they can always claim ignorance. And, legally, ignorance is much better than negligence.
For doctors, it’s best to ignore these devices and this data. Too much data coming at you. And too many unknowns. With increasing data streams targeted at you and increasing risk of malpractice, it’s probably better to just keep your distance and call them “cute.”

jayparkinsonmd:

See that weird rash caused by a fitbit? That’s the only time a doctor will ever care about your fitbit. They’ll never care about the data generated from these devices, ever. Why?

Because ignorance is bliss. Imagine if a doctor’s typical panel of 2500 patients all had fitbits and were all generating data and sharing all that daily data with doctors. That’s a lot of data for a doctor to digest on a daily basis. Of course the doctor surely wouldn’t be responsible for all of that data. The doctor would only be responsible for the data that sets off some sort of trigger. Let’s say that there’s a miracle device with a miracle algorithm that flags 1% of users as atypical and something the doctor should be analyzing. That means a doctor would then be looking at data from 25 patients a day. Doctors typically see 25 patients a day in their practice, so now they are responsible for 25 more patients, analyzing their data, and then acting on the results. Meanwhile they’re not getting paid for this kind of management. Would this be a co-pay that patients pay? Could doctors open up cases for you that would then give them the freedom to take your co-pay whenever they want?

And what happens when they overlook a blip in someone’s data and don’t act on it? Are they negligent? Will they be sued for malpractice? Will you also be able to sue Apple or Fitbit because of a flawed algorithm that didn’t trigger alarms for life-threatening data it’s collecting about you? 

It’s the same issue with paper records. If you have your paper records and deliver an inch-thick of paper to your new doctor, it’s in the doctor’s best interest to refuse to take them. Because if they do take them, they are assuming responsibility for them and are then expected to know the information in that stack of papers. If they don’t take them, they can always claim ignorance. And, legally, ignorance is much better than negligence.

For doctors, it’s best to ignore these devices and this data. Too much data coming at you. And too many unknowns. With increasing data streams targeted at you and increasing risk of malpractice, it’s probably better to just keep your distance and call them “cute.”