Colbert’s dilemma is that he didn’t become a true successor to David Letterman by taking over Letterman’s job. He did so by hosting Report and, like Dave before him, reinventing what a television show could do. Now, again like Letterman before him, he’s moving to CBS and the second, less interesting phase of his career. Colbert has made it to the top. He just had to take a step down to get there.

I am telling you if there is a God, when I get to heaven I’m not stopping to be interviewed. I am heading straight in. I have earned my place in heaven. It’s not even close.

Michael Bloomberg

Three things:

  1. *BARF*
  2. If there is a God, it’s my understanding that he’s kind of an asshole about the whole “if” thing, so don’t be so sure. 
  3. I instantly imagined Steve Jobs pointing at Mayor B. and muttering, “Wow. Get a load of this pompous egomaniac.” 

[My colleague] and I were on our way to the 16th Street BART station — I’ll note that I wasn’t using any device at the time — when a person put their hand on my face and yelled, “Glass!”

In an instant the person was sprinting away, Google Glass in hand.

I ran after, through traffic, to the corner of the opposite block. The person pivoted, shifting their weight to put all of their momentum into an overhand swing. The Google Glass smashed into the ground, and they ran in another direction.

While I may not be a resident of San Francisco — I live across the Bay in Berkeley, where rent is affordable — or a wealthy young software engineer, I’ve worked in the city for three years. I’d like to live and work in or near San Francisco for the foreseeable future.

Unfortunately, anything associated with Google has come to represent gentrification in the city, from the buses that take young software engineers to their corporate campuses in Silicon Valley to Google Glass. This is especially true in areas where gentrification and income inequality have become points of conflict in the community.

People are being evicted or priced out of their homes. What’s the difference between losing your home and having property destroyed?

I was pretty shaken after seeing someone completely disregard my personal space and property without provocation. I imagine that feeling is only a shadow of what dislocated people in this city experience every day.

Solid Steel’s ‘30 Years of Acid’ mix features one track per year for every year since 1984. 

Chris & Cosey _ Dancing Ghosts _ Doublevision - 1984
Knight Action _ R-Trax (Special Mix) _ Let’s Dance - 1985
Sleazy D _ I’ve Lost Control _ Trax - 1986
Phuture _ Acid Tracks _ Trax - 1987
808 State _ Flow Coma _ Creed - 1988
Gene Hunt _ Living In A Land _ Housetime - 1989
Bobby Konders _ Nervous Acid _ Nu Groove - 1990
UR _ 303 Sunset _ Underground Resistance - 1991
Acid Junkies _ Short On Acid _ Djax-Up Beats - 1992
Fred Gianelli _ Eloquence _ Telepathic - 1993
Armando _ Pleasuredome _ Trax - 1994
Link & E621 _ Antacid _ Warp - 1995
Woody Mc Bride _ The Birdman _ Communique - 1996
Ege Bam Yasi _ Acid C.I.D. (Sub Version) _ Subversive - 1997
Plastikman _ Rekall _ Minus - 1998
The Black Dog _ Psycosyin _ Warp - 1999
Luke Vibert _ Analord _ Planet Mu - 2000
Phuture _ Box Energy (AFX Remix) _ Rephlex - 2001
Dr Derek F _ Chrome Tear _ Skam - 2002
Luke Vibert _ Love Acid _ Warp - 2003
DK7 _ Slipstream _ Output - 2004
AFX _ Boxing Day _ Rephlex - 2005
The Doubtful Guest _ Snoutful (Posthuman Remix) _ Seed - 2006
Syntheme _ Easy _ Planet Mu - 2007
Mark Archer _ Riser _ Mutate - 2008
Legowelt _ Zompy Land _ Crème Organization - 2009
Global Goon _ Craehzrhd _ Balkan Vinyl - 2010
Affie Yusuf _ Acid Plaground _ Balkan Vinyl - 2011
Cassegrain & Tin Man _ Sear _ Killekill - 2012
Mark Archer _ Cogzy _ Anecdote - 2013
Posthuman _ Back To Acid _ Body Work - 2014

"Samsung says it refined its focus, but that’s not really true: there are still too many features, too many options, too many weird ideas about how we want to use our phones. It’s just all been tossed in a pile, thrown under a blanket, and swept into the corner where we hopefully won’t notice. The S5’s settings menu is 61 items long, and shows by default a grid of all-but-identical circular icons. Good luck with that.

The notification pull-down menu has 20 different options, from Airplane Mode to Toolbox (which toggles a button that toggles a list of apps you might want to open, which is not to be confused with the multitasking view or the multi-window view or the app drawer). And for all the “simplification,” there are still 27 options in the camera menu. Samsung’s latest version of TouchWiz is layered on top of Android 4.4.2, and it’s a lot more cohesive in appearance than before, but it’s still little more than a junkyard full of 11 ways to do the same thing you’ll never ever want to do. Samsung says all the right things about cleaning up and simplifying the experience, but the S5 bears few of the fruits of those promises.

The S5’s built-in and pre-loaded apps are a similar mix: a number of useful, effective additions that are all too easily missed in the ocean of icons on the phone. S Health is in theory a good idea, a full-featured fitness app that lets you track everything from steps to calories. But it’s no more useful than, say, Fitbit, except that it integrates with Samsung’s other devices like the Gear and Gear Fit, and with the heart-rate monitor that carves a divot out of the phone’s backside.” 

Samsung Galaxy S5: Impressive in the showroom, clusterfuck in your pocket.

"Romney adopted knee-jerk anti-Russian positions on every relevant issue, and married them to reflexive anti-Obama criticisms. That’s all that he did. It isn’t surprising, since he had no particular foreign policy experience, nor had he had much of an interest in these issues before he started his seemingly endless presidential campaigning. Romney had no particular insight into Russian behavior, and definitely didn’t understand what motivated Russian leaders or how they viewed U.S. policies in the former Soviet Union and elsewhere. If the U.S. had been following his recommendations over the last year, tensions between the U.S. and Russia would likely be even worse, since Romney’s idea for Russia policy in practice was little more than to antagonize Moscow whenever possible."

Romney Wasn’t “Churchill-Like” on Russia, He Was Thoroughly Ignorant

"Among the series enjoying critical acclaim — True Detective, Breaking Bad — women are often either shiftless femmes fatales or harried wife-mothers the protagonist is neglecting/staying alive to provide for. In the USA consultant procedural, girlfriends and wives are always first and foremost teammates and partners. They’re never victims, and their lives can’t be traded in for male character development. Sex itself is an afterthought on all these shows — never a central plot point or a significant character motivation. It’s one of the reasons media critics tend not to take the series seriously, but it’s a small price to pay for some television that doesn’t center on sexual violence."

USA Network Is Television’s Best Answer To The Shifting Social Order

A bill that would require craft brewers to sell their suds to a beer distributor and make them buy it back to sell at their own breweries has cleared a Senate panel.
 
The measure (SB 1714) has so infuriated craft brewers and beer enthusiasts that some on Twitter have christened it with the hashtag “#growlergate.” The Community Affairs committee approved the bill Tuesday.
 
Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, was so incensed at the idea of craft brewers having to pay someone else to sell their own product that he likened it to a mobbed-up racket. Latvala has championed the microbrewery cause.
 
The requirement is similar to paying “protection to ‘Vinnie’ in New York,” he said.
 
The bill also is favored by the Big Beer lobby, which is feeling the heat from craft beer’s competition.

The Internet swears Juliana Hatfield’s ‘President Garfield’ is about Henry Rollins. Entertainment Weekly called it a “thinly veiled dig”. I never thought about it before, but I can see it now. I’m not sure if I see the negative angle, though. I may have known the story behind it at one point. I listened to this record a lot. But that was a long time ago. 

Every time that truck goes by, I think of you
You drove right through the wall
And now the kids all wanna follow you
I don’t smoke, so why am I smokin’?
Took a hit and now I’m chokin’

He wrote a book about himself
I keep it on my shelf and when I was in Washington,
I walked down all the streets of which he wrote
I can’t sing, I’m not a singer
I swear, I’m gonna kill myself if you bring her
Her, her, her, her, her, her

Iron will, iron hand, neck like a tire, iron man
Iron fist, pump that jam, iron eye, iron gland
Iron face, iron plan, fill that empty coffee can
Iron bar, metal band, pumping iron man

I am only human, I am weak
I want his power inside of me
And I’m not talking about a piece of meat
I’m saying something really deep

policymic:

The less people know where Ukraine is, the more they want America to intervene
Turns out many of the people calling for a military intervention in Ukraine as a response to the illegal Russian annexation of the Crimean peninsula have one thing in common: They have no idea where Ukraine is on a map.
No, really. According to polling data from political scientists Kyle Dropp (Darthmouth), Joshua D. Kertzer (Harvard), and Thomas Zeitzoff (Princeton), there’s a direct statistical correlation between not knowing where Ukraine was and wanting the United States to intervene with military force. The researchers asked a national sample of 2,066 Americans at the end of March about their demographic characteristics as well as their general foreign policy attitudes. Then they asked to the respondents to pinpoint Ukraine on a map, which is where it gets pretty dicey. The results can be seen above; the dots shift from blue to red as they near the actual location of the conflicted country.
Read more 

policymic:

The less people know where Ukraine is, the more they want America to intervene

Turns out many of the people calling for a military intervention in Ukraine as a response to the illegal Russian annexation of the Crimean peninsula have one thing in common: They have no idea where Ukraine is on a map.

No, really. According to polling data from political scientists Kyle Dropp (Darthmouth), Joshua D. Kertzer (Harvard), and Thomas Zeitzoff (Princeton), there’s a direct statistical correlation between not knowing where Ukraine was and wanting the United States to intervene with military force. The researchers asked a national sample of 2,066 Americans at the end of March about their demographic characteristics as well as their general foreign policy attitudes. Then they asked to the respondents to pinpoint Ukraine on a map, which is where it gets pretty dicey. The results can be seen above; the dots shift from blue to red as they near the actual location of the conflicted country.

Read more