I love these guys too much. 

The anger of the Palestinians cannot be ended by killing their children. That is a fantasy. Human beings simply aren’t made that way.

Wallace Shawn

Shawn attended The Putney School, a private liberal arts high school in Putney, Vermont, and graduated with an A.B. in history from Harvard College. He studied economics and philosophy at Oxford, originally intending to become a diplomat; he also traveled to India as an English teacher, on a Fulbright program.

Ralph is not a rule-follower like Lisa, nor a rule-breaker like Bart; Ralph does not observe the rules because he is almost completely unaware of them. More than any of the other students at Springfield Elementary, Ralph is a child. Bart and Lisa and Milhouse and Nelson and Janey are kids, and therein lies the difference.

Ralph Wiggum’s Finest Moments

"Child" versus "kid."

Wow. I’d never really thought about that distinction before, so, when I read this today, it hit me like a ton of bricks.

My daughter is mostly still a child—not quite a kid—and a lot of stuff makes more sense if I keep that in mind.

(via merlin)

Is it racist that a white, 20 year old unarmed kid was shot by a black cop on Monday, Aug 18, 3 days ago and its no where in the news? Oh wait, it happens all the time, its just not newsworthy. Sucks to be white. — Asked by Anonymous

yoisthisracist:

Dear Racists: I know you’re going to to be trotting this out in the next few days claiming that this shows how white people are just as badly treated as black people in the US (though, of course, the idea that “it happens all the time” to white people is, of course, a ridiculous and disgusting lie).

But guess what, fuckheads, as usual, you’re wrong as fuck. The reason this tragedy isn’t national news is because, surprise surprise, a similar (ish) shooting of a white teenager by a black cop is being handled by the authorities completely differently! That’s right, you dumbfucks, this officer is being immediately and vigorously investigated, the officer’s name was released, the victim wasn’t denied medical care, nor was his body left on the street for hours. It’s almost like we treat black and white people differently in our justice system! And if you want to argue that the fucking Salt Lake City PD (oh shit, was I able to read about this case in the NATIONAL NEWS?!?!?! ) is racist against white people, you are fucking out of your mind.

So, nice try, you asshole, I know you were salivating over finding a case to compare this to Mike Brown, but, even with this timing, you’re not even fucking close to proving your racist “point.”

thingiverse:

How much more minimalist can a Macbook stand be?

None. None more minimalist.

I’m running the Yosemite beta, which makes me want to use my 13” Retina display instead of my big non-Retina monitor. Walter Hsiao’s MacBook Pro Display Stand is just what the doctor ordered. 

jayparkinsonmd:

See that weird rash caused by a fitbit? That’s the only time a doctor will ever care about your fitbit. They’ll never care about the data generated from these devices, ever. Why?
Because ignorance is bliss. Imagine if a doctor’s typical panel of 2500 patients all had fitbits and were all generating data and sharing all that daily data with doctors. That’s a lot of data for a doctor to digest on a daily basis. Of course the doctor surely wouldn’t be responsible for all of that data. The doctor would only be responsible for the data that sets off some sort of trigger. Let’s say that there’s a miracle device with a miracle algorithm that flags 1% of users as atypical and something the doctor should be analyzing. That means a doctor would then be looking at data from 25 patients a day. Doctors typically see 25 patients a day in their practice, so now they are responsible for 25 more patients, analyzing their data, and then acting on the results. Meanwhile they’re not getting paid for this kind of management. Would this be a co-pay that patients pay? Could doctors open up cases for you that would then give them the freedom to take your co-pay whenever they want?
And what happens when they overlook a blip in someone’s data and don’t act on it? Are they negligent? Will they be sued for malpractice? Will you also be able to sue Apple or Fitbit because of a flawed algorithm that didn’t trigger alarms for life-threatening data it’s collecting about you? 
It’s the same issue with paper records. If you have your paper records and deliver an inch-thick of paper to your new doctor, it’s in the doctor’s best interest to refuse to take them. Because if they do take them, they are assuming responsibility for them and are then expected to know the information in that stack of papers. If they don’t take them, they can always claim ignorance. And, legally, ignorance is much better than negligence.
For doctors, it’s best to ignore these devices and this data. Too much data coming at you. And too many unknowns. With increasing data streams targeted at you and increasing risk of malpractice, it’s probably better to just keep your distance and call them “cute.”

jayparkinsonmd:

See that weird rash caused by a fitbit? That’s the only time a doctor will ever care about your fitbit. They’ll never care about the data generated from these devices, ever. Why?

Because ignorance is bliss. Imagine if a doctor’s typical panel of 2500 patients all had fitbits and were all generating data and sharing all that daily data with doctors. That’s a lot of data for a doctor to digest on a daily basis. Of course the doctor surely wouldn’t be responsible for all of that data. The doctor would only be responsible for the data that sets off some sort of trigger. Let’s say that there’s a miracle device with a miracle algorithm that flags 1% of users as atypical and something the doctor should be analyzing. That means a doctor would then be looking at data from 25 patients a day. Doctors typically see 25 patients a day in their practice, so now they are responsible for 25 more patients, analyzing their data, and then acting on the results. Meanwhile they’re not getting paid for this kind of management. Would this be a co-pay that patients pay? Could doctors open up cases for you that would then give them the freedom to take your co-pay whenever they want?

And what happens when they overlook a blip in someone’s data and don’t act on it? Are they negligent? Will they be sued for malpractice? Will you also be able to sue Apple or Fitbit because of a flawed algorithm that didn’t trigger alarms for life-threatening data it’s collecting about you? 

It’s the same issue with paper records. If you have your paper records and deliver an inch-thick of paper to your new doctor, it’s in the doctor’s best interest to refuse to take them. Because if they do take them, they are assuming responsibility for them and are then expected to know the information in that stack of papers. If they don’t take them, they can always claim ignorance. And, legally, ignorance is much better than negligence.

For doctors, it’s best to ignore these devices and this data. Too much data coming at you. And too many unknowns. With increasing data streams targeted at you and increasing risk of malpractice, it’s probably better to just keep your distance and call them “cute.”

Female voters in the US have been called “soccer moms” and “security moms”. In 2004, single women were “Sex and the City voters”. Now – because apparently women can’t ever just be “citizens” or “voters”, or more likely because conservatives prefer to call us names instead of delving too deep into women’s issues – we are “Beyoncé voters”. Bow down, bitches.

Most single ladies would generally be thrilled with a comparison to Queen Bey in any way, shape or form, but the cutesy nicknames for politically-engaged women need to stop. Surely pundits and the political media culture can deal with the collective electoral power of the majority voting bloc in this country in some better way than symbolically calling us “sweetheart”, complete with head pat.
Jessica Valenti: Nick-naming women ‘Beyoncé voters’ is exactly why we don’t vote Republican (via gregferrell)
It’s not the federal government but the local police department that has come to pacify the populace and nullify certain inconvenient Constitutional guarantees. It’s not internationalist coastal elites, but authority-worshipping middle Americans who are marching down the streets with rifles in hand. Friends, neighbors, patriots. “Good people,” [The NRA’s] LaPierre calls them, along with Rand Paul. When you see them coming, these good people bearing arms, don’t shoot—run.

12 plays

I remembered this being good. It’s a fine tribute. 

FAQ: What are some alternatives to Beats?

I love love love The Wirecutter. It’s an invaluable tool. 

Amazon is not your friend. Neither is any other corporation. It and they do what they do for their own interest and are more than willing to try to make you try believe that what they do for their own benefit is in fact for yours. It’s not. In this particular case, this is not about readers or authors or anyone else but Amazon wanting eBooks capped at $9.99 for its own purposes. It should stop pretending that this is about anything other than that. Readers, authors, and everyone else should stop pretending it’s about anything other than that, too.

imageoscillite:

Faithless - Mass Destruction 

I’m on a Faithless kick lately. It happens about once a year. 

What I’m listening to lately. 
rdio.com/people/ericmortensen

What I’m listening to lately. 

rdio.com/people/ericmortensen